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Justify The Thrill
Lyrics: John Popper
Music: Chan Kinchla

Break away break away
Blynken and Nod
Carelessly with matches play
Telling you you're odd
Foolishly he lets it burn
Aware of different shapes
And so he makes his hand a fist
And never looks at what he rapes

And who am I to say I don't understand it
And if feeling better justifies the thrill
Who'd be stupid enough to say it doesn't have to be that way
I will

Sing a song of sixty pence
For a pocket full of rye

And kill all that he represents
To ensure that he will die
Chase him from the public square
Or hang him from a tree
And tell his kind they best beware
Because he's different from me

And who am I to say I don't understand it
And if feeling better justifies the thrill
Who'd be stupid enough to say it doesn't have to be that way
I will

Twinkle twinkle little star
We have you in our sights
Dangerous, we come this far
The serpent giggles with delight
The pig's head on a stick does grin
As we teeter on the brink
He's singing you are all my children
My island's bigger than you think

And who am I to say I don't understand it
And if feeling better justifies the thrill
Who'd be stupid enough to say it doesn't have to be that way
I will
I will
I will
I will

1997 Blues Traveler Publishing Corporation



First release: Straight On Till Morning
Released: 07/01/1997
Earliest time played: 07/03/1996
Last time played: 11/08/2002
Playing frequency:
  50 plays (see all shows)
  2.69% of shows in the database
  4.17% of shows since debut
  Detailed statistics
Song information:
  Formerly known as "I Will"

Other recordings of "Justify The Thrill":
  Carolina Blues, 1997
  Straight On Till Morning studio cuts, 1997


Blynken and Nod
Two-thirds of Wynken, Blynken and Nod, made famous by the 19th-century nursery rhyme/lullaby of the same name. Written by Eugene Field, the names were designed as references to what a child does while falling asleep - winking, then blinking, and finally nodding off. The final stanza is reproduced here:

Wynken and Blynken are two little eyes,
And Nod is a little head,
And the wooden shoe that sailed the skies
Is a wee one's trundle-bed.
So shut your eyes while mother sings
Of wonderful sights that be,
And you shall see the beautiful things
As you rock in the misty sea,
Where the old shoe rocked the fishermen three:
Wynken,
Blynken,
And Nod.

Sing a song of sixty pence/For a pocket full of rye
A bit of inflation on another nursery rhyme, also referenced in "Mulling It Over":
Sing a song of sixpence
A pocket full of rye
Four and twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie
The King was in his counting house
Counting out his money
The Queen was in the parlor
Eating bread and honey
When the pie was opened
The birds began to sing
Was that not a tasty dish
To set before a king?
The Maid was in the garden
Hanging out the clothes
When down came a blackbird
And snapped off her nose!

Several meanings have been ascribed to these lines, including the spoilation of England's monasteries by King Henry VIII, the crew of Blackbeard the pirate, who paid his men sixpence a day, to the failure of a poet laureate named Pye in the audience of King George III.

Twinkle twinkle little star
The opening line of the nursery rhyme of the same name. See "Mulling It Over".

The pig's head on a stick
A reference to the William Golding novel Lord of the Flies, where a group of boys shipwreck on a deserted island and form their own tribe to fight for their survival. They kill a pig for food and mounts its head on a stick, and one of the characters comes across it later. Hallucinating, the character carries on a conversation with the head, dubbed "Lord of the Flies", which says, among other things, "I'm part of you".